FUN with EPOXY!

So, you’ll try really hard to get those strips tight to each other but the reality is there WILL be gaps. don’t sweat it, it happens to everyone. Just mix some cedar flour and silica with your epoxy til it’s a peanut butter paste consistency. Fill the gaps with the epoxy and scrape away any excess. Whatever you don’t scrape away now you’ll have to sand off later but just know that’s happening regardless. If you weren’t ready to sand you should never have started this project. what are you doing. stop right now and question all your life decisions that have led you to this point.

 

you good? ok, let the epoxy sit overnight and then sand the canoe for what will feel like the first in a million sandings.

#cedarstripcanoe #epoxy

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

Featured Woodworker: Trip Wilcox

Now I’d like to take some time to talk about my shop helper. We’re doing some work-release internships with the Emerald Bay retirement home down the road and we thought ‘hey, he looks like he might operate power tools without safety goggles. let’s give him a shot!’. and here he is, pulling staples. his talents know no bounds!

 

haha lol jk that’s my dad. and if it weren’t for him i’d still be trying to figure out what wood to buy. if anyone is the helper here, it’s allllllll me.

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

thanks for all your help.

be sure and recycle your scrap staples. or throw them away, why listen to me?

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

wanna help me pull a few staples?

only eleventy jillion staples in this thing. the wood glue is holding it together so there’s no worries about it falling apart. plus, the screws are still on the first pieces at the bottom keeping the canoe connected to the stations. but the staples must go! be careful when removing staples. if you dig in too far with the puller you might create indentations that will have to be filled later with epoxy. There’s also a trick to hide the staple holes so they don’t show up later when you lay on the fiberglass.

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

strips are done, mannnn…

the reeeeally hard pard of laying these strips is, of course, near the end. When they’re near the bottom (where you begin, which is technically the top of the canoe but it’s upside down right now… just, go with it), the strip is vertical the entire length of the canoe. When it begins to round over as you work your way up, the strips gradually turn horizontal to the point that the last few full length strips must start out vertical only to curve over to horizontal. It also takes some work getting those last full length pieces to fit together just right. Remember, you’re using the bead and cove method which means at some point you’ll have a cove meeting a cove where they touch together, bend away and then back together at the opposite end. You’ll have to shave these pieces at an angle to make them fit together. It’s… a process. but I did it and so can you!

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

FINISHED… with the strips…

All the planning of the strips almost didn’t work out. Because of a few mistakes we had to pull some strips off and when we did they became un-useable. Luckily we had plenty of wood and were able to cut new strips. We made a pretty cool alternating pattern for the keel. Hopefully this really shines when you’re paddling along.

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

this thing is a monster

a monster 18 foot canoe. we measured my truck today. it’s 14 feet. so the canoe will hang two feet over the front and back of my truck. also, in related news, i have to figure out how i’m going to transport this thing back to Dallas!

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

getting closer! (but not really because we’re not even done laying strips yet!)

as we get closer to the top, you’ll notice an issue with the stem and the first station. the ‘Stems’ are the perpendicular pieces that will shape the bow and stern of the canoe. The strips are stapled against the stems on each end. They’re supposed to be glued and clamped together (we glued. clamped? notsomuch). What you don’t want is a stem that’s physically higher than the first station. why? if it’s higher than the first station the wood will have to bend to make it over the station and down to the stem. It’s not much but it’s a hump and it will bother you. i know this. because mine was too high. go back and look! we had to do some minor repairs and pull off a couple strips to make adjustments. OH, now is also a good time to make a note that you should’ve used painter’s tape on your station edges that the strips are being stapled. Why? because if you don’t the wood glue will seep through and glue your canoe to the stations. And cedarstrip canoes are big strong canoes that don’t need no bulkheads.

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

safety first!

hold my beer.

#safetyfirst

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

progress

a note about the woodglue: you’ll be tempted to wipe off all the glue as you progress to each new strip of cedar. As you push the strip down and secure it against the station, it will push a bead of glue out on each side of the strip (inside and outside the canoe). it’s tempting to wipe it away and its definitely doable with a wet rag as the glue is water soluble. But this isn’t necessary as once the glue dries it is very easy to scrape off. Plus, you won’t see any spots of dried glue like you do on my canoe. Those will sand out later, but it’s an unnecessary pain in the ass down the line. see? i’m helping you already.

#cedarstripcanoe

A post shared by _graylikethecolor_ (@_graylikethecolor_) on

the twitter

open